Not only do they think you're stupid, but they bank on it. Have you seen a ribbon on the Good & Plenty Hershey's box that says "a fat-free candy"? Sure, there is no fat in the box....but it is misleading. The candy is 100% sugar and processed carbs. And Heryshey's banks on and knows the average American equates fat-free with being good for you. Here are some more facts the food-industry banks on: The average american eats 2700calories/day, up from 2200 in 1970. The average american drinks 450 liquid-calories a day. Fresh fruit/veggies cost 10 times more than junk food. Your food can legally contain maggots and rat poop. Sure, its only in trace amounts and while the small amount wont cause harm, the thought of it will. Smaller portions are equally as satisfying. A few studies showed participants rating their fullness after eating a small portion and then another 160 calories. Their fullness was the same. Between 1977-1996, the average cheeeseburger grew in size by 25%. What do hamburgers and fertilizers have in common? Ammonia. It is used to kill E.coli bacteria in your food and also clean the dirt in your bathroom. Junk food is an addictive drug.…
Vitamins are organic (biologically produced) compounds that are required as nutrients for the human body to function properly, and which needs to be acquired by being eaten. The body produces numerous organic compounds, but if your body can’t create enough of a necessary compound to meet its own needs, that compound is labeled as a Vitamin. The word itself comes from the root words vital (meaning “life”) and amine (organic compound)--indicating organic compounds that are needed to sustain life. The term “Vitamin” isn’t applied to nutrients needed in large quantities (like carbohydrates and proteins) or to nutrients needed in small quantities which the body can provide for itself. Since you can’t manufacture enough of these compounds yourself, you need to get them through your diet, or by taking supplemental pills which provide a concentrated dose of particular vitamins. Every Vitamin can be found naturally in certain foods, and a person could theoretically acquire all the needed nutrients through a carefully crafted and balanced diet. However, even healthy eaters are hard pressed to regularly take in sufficient amounts of every needed Vitamin, which is why Vitamin pills are a good idea as “back-up” even for healthy eaters. Different Vitamins perform all…
A key feature of physical activity is that it increases the rate of energy expenditure. Athletes therefore have a greater need for energy nutrients (carbohydrate, protein, and fat) than do non-athletes, and much research focuses on the best strategies for meeting these energy requirements while ensuring optimal distribution of the energy substrates to support exercise of various intensities and durations. It is clear that the higher the exercise intensity, the greater the proportionate reliance on carbohydrate as a fuel, and many studies provide valuable insights on the best consumption patterns for optimizing glycogen stores, ensuring adequate carbohydrate availability during training and competition, and reducing muscle soreness and enhancing muscle recovery. The contribution of protein to muscle function and recovery is much better understood now than in the recent past, and there is considerable information about how carbohydrate, protein, and fat influence mental and muscle function. The recent popularity of higher-protein, higher-fat, and lower-carbohydrate diets has serious and potentially negative implications for athletic performance. Nevertheless, their popularity may be better understood if viewed in the context of food intolerances and food sensitivities rather than their potential for directly influencing performance. It is important that athletes and coaches understand how the appropriate…